University of Hawai驶i System News /news News from the University of 花秀直播 Sat, 25 May 2024 02:48:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 /news/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-UHNews512-1-32x32.jpg University of Hawai驶i System News /news 32 32 28449828 Free summer program for Hawai驶i HS students interested in intelligence field /news/2024/05/26/ahi-sp-2024-recruitment/ Sun, 26 May 2024 18:00:09 +0000 /news/?p=198405 Reading time: 3 minutes The program is a dynamic, immersive learning experience in one of the state鈥檚 fastest-growing fields.

The post Free summer program for Hawai驶i HS students interested in intelligence field first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes
people standing in a circle
Thirty students participated in the 2023 Academy for Hawaiʻi Intelligence Studies Summer Program. (Photo credit: Sara Maaria Saastamoinen)

Hawaiʻi high school students can take advantage of a free four-week University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补 summer program that will introduce them to the field of national intelligence. Applications are due June 1.

The (CSS) is bringing back the (AHI-SP POLS) for a second year.

large group of students
(Photo credit: Sara Maaria Saastamoinen)

AHI-SP POLS was the first program of its kind in Hawaiʻi that provided high schoolers statewide with college credit for a workforce pathway to national intelligence,” said Jairus Grove, AHI-SP POLS program director and political science professor. “It revealed an overwhelming demand and enthusiasm for educational programs in this field. We鈥檙e proud to be able to expand the program to 40 students this year to meet increased demand.”

AHI-SP POLS changed my life,” said Tasanee Cogliandro, a graduate of the inaugural AHI-SP POLS class and currently a senior at K墨hei Charter High School in Maui. “I wasn’t sure what (career) I wanted to go into until I participated in this program and really understood that I truly do have a passion for political science.”

AHI-SP POLS is a dynamic, immersive learning experience in one of the state鈥檚 fastest-growing fields. It runs July 5–27, 2024, and includes an online component (July 5–20) and an in-person residence week on the UH 惭腻苍辞补 campus with simulations, games, lectures and field trips (July 21–27). Participants earn three college credits for completing the program and will be honored at a commencement ceremony on July 26.

An informational session via Zoom will be held at 7 p.m. HST, Wednesday, May 29. Pre-registration for the session is required by emailing cssahi@hawaii.edu.

Expenses for AHI-SP POLS students, including registration, tuition/fees, airfare and on-campus housing/meals are paid through the Pacific Intelligence and Innovation Initiative (P3I).

This statewide opportunity is open to qualified Hawaiʻi high school juniors and seniors, and incoming UH 惭腻苍辞补 freshmen. Participants must be Hawai驶i residents with a minimum high school GPA of 3.0 (GPA based on cumulative grades–9th grade to fall 2023).

More 2024 program highlights

  • Course overview: AHI-SP POLS introduces students to a wide variety of concepts including power and contemporary world politics since 1945, with an emphasis on the U.S. role. Simulation games, field trips and networking opportunities with Hawaiʻi-based industry experts provide an interactive experience bringing real world experiences to complement in-class learning.
  • College credits: Students who successfully complete the program will earn college credits in POLS 120: Introduction to World Politics, a university-level course in political science. POLS 120 is the first course in the Intelligence Studies course sequence currently under development at CSS.
  • More information: Academy for Hawaiʻi Intelligence Studies Summer Program

Launched in summer 2023, AHI-SP POLS is part of the College of Social Sciences鈥 ongoing commitment to support workforce development opportunities in the state. Participants in the inaugural cohort included 30 high school juniors and seniors from Hawaiʻi, Kauaʻi, Maui and Oʻahu. They were:

  • 77% female
  • 80% from Hawaiʻi State Department of Education high schools and charter schools
  • 57% from the neighbor islands (30% from Maui, 17% from Hawaiʻi Island, 10% from Kauaʻi and 43% from Oʻahu)
The post Free summer program for Hawai驶i HS students interested in intelligence field first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198405
Discovery could lead to more effective drug treatments /news/2024/05/24/more-effective-drug-treatments/ Sat, 25 May 2024 02:00:35 +0000 /news/?p=198401 Reading time: < 1 minute The researchers showed that their method works well with compounds used in drugs for treating some cancers and cystic fibrosis.

The post Discovery could lead to more effective drug treatments first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: < 1 minute

large shelves of medicines

A new, simpler way to make important chemicals used in many medicines has been discovered by University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补 scientists.

These chemicals (called 1,4-cis-disubstituted cyclic compounds) help make drugs work better and absorb in the human body more easily. The new method uses common methods and ingredients, making it much easier to produce these chemicals, overcoming long-standing challenges in producing these chemicals.

The researchers showed that their method works well with compounds used in drugs for treating some cancers and cystic fibrosis. This discovery could change how drugs are made by making it simpler to create these complex chemicals.

“Easier and faster production means that new medicines could be developed more quickly, offering a wider range of effective treatments,” said UH 惭腻苍辞补 Assistant Professor Zuxiao Zhang. “Since many current drugs use these chemicals, this new method could lead to better and more accessible medications, greatly benefiting the pharmaceutical industry and patients alike.”

.

Other authors on the paper include UH 惭腻苍辞补 Associate Professor Rui Sun, postdoctoral researcher Komal Yadav and graduate student Tiancen Bian. UH 惭腻苍辞补 also worked with researchers from Zhejiang Normal University.

The Department of Chemistry is housed in the UH 惭腻苍辞补 .

The post Discovery could lead to more effective drug treatments first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198401
碍补耻补驶颈 HS senior surprised with free tuition in #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 contest /news/2024/05/24/javinar-take-me-to-manoa/ Fri, 24 May 2024 22:00:35 +0000 /news/?p=198368 Reading time: 2 minutes Via Javinar鈥檚 video entry for the 2024 #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 scholarship contest won her a year of free tuition at UH 惭腻苍辞补.

The post 碍补耻补驶颈 HS senior surprised with free tuition in #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 contest first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes

In Kauaʻi High School senior Via Javinar鈥檚 video entry for the 2024 #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 scholarship contest, she expressed her love for the Hawaiʻi community and her determination to show that there are no limitations to the place that you live. While her dreams can be achieved anywhere, she believes the perfect place to further her education is at the University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补.

Javinar鈥檚 #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 scholarship contest win was unveiled live on television during her graduation rehearsal. UH 惭腻苍辞补 Associate Director of Admissions Shauna Pimentel-Motooka and (HNN) Anchor Dillon Ancheta surprised her with the news that she would be receiving a free year of tuition for UH 惭腻苍辞补, funded by (UHFCU).

via javinar holding check with family
Via Javinar (second from right) is the sixth winner of the #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 contest

“This is very surreal. I鈥檓 just really, really excited and happy,” said Javinar. “Hawaiʻi is my home. Leaving this place, I knew it would be hard for me, and that鈥檚 why I decided on (attending) 惭腻苍辞补.”

Javinar received a large check, lei and gifts as her mother, Hilda, brothers Vincent and Vernon, and grandmother surrounded her during the announcement. Her classmates, teachers and administrators filled the Kauaʻi High School gym with cheers as they celebrated her scholarship win.

At UH 惭腻苍辞补, Javinar plans to pursue .

Meet previous #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 winners

“It is so exciting for us to provide a scholarship that will support Via at the start of her college journey,” said UHFCU President and CEO Travis Bow. “We proudly invest in students and their education as they become the future leaders and innovators of our community. We wish Via nothing but the best on her academic journey!”

“We were very impressed with Via’s ability to convey such a powerful message in a 60-second video,” said Pimentel-Motooka. “I was honored to present Via with her scholarship yesterday. The surprise, happiness and gratitude that Via and her family expressed were very touching. She exhibits both academic and creative strengths and we are very excited for the bright future that she has ahead of her at the University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补.”

UHFCU has sponsored the #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 contest for six years, surprising recipients with HNN since 2018. Read more about previous winners.

The post 碍补耻补驶颈 HS senior surprised with free tuition in #TakeMeTo惭腻苍辞补 contest first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198368
Celebrating 50 years of the UH law school /news/2024/05/24/law-school-50-years/ Fri, 24 May 2024 21:43:36 +0000 /news/?p=198346 Reading time: 3 minutes The William S. Richardson School of Law is commemorating its 50th anniversary this month with a gala on May 31.

The post Celebrating 50 years of the UH law school first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes
old group photo
The UH law school鈥檚 first graduating class of 1976.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa is commemorating its 50th anniversary with a gala on May 31.

Opened in 1973, Richardson is the only law school in Hawaiʻi. Its founder and namesake, , spearheaded the drive to establish the school beginning in 1966. Known as “CJ” in the law school community, he served as a community leader in many roles, including as the chief justice of the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court from 1966 to 1982. He was a trailblazer and passionate advocate for 贬补飞补颈ʻ颈鈥檚 diverse communities, pushing to expand Native 花秀直播an rights and broadening the rights for people to challenge important environmental and land development decisions.

judges sitting together
William S. Richardson (middle) served as chief justice of the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court.

The first class of 53 students began their studies in wooden buildings in the Quarry. After growing and expanding programs, the school eventually moved to its current home on Dole Street in 1983. That same year, the Law Library opened, and the school was officially named after William S. Richardson. In 2019, the Clinical Building opened its doors. Most recently, the law school launched a part-time online program in fall 2023.

“It has been a privilege and an honor to serve as dean of this esteemed institution, following in the footsteps of many devoted leaders and inspired by our founder, Chief Justice William S. Richardson,” said UH law school Dean Camille Nelson. “I am awed by our students and alumni, who continue to profoundly impact our communities, and grateful for the support, guidance, and mentorship of our world-class faculty and dedicated staff. In our 50th year, we remain committed to empowering and nurturing future generations of leaders.”

people standing outside a building
The law school opened in wooden buildings in the Quarry.

Over the years, the law school has partnered with many of its thousands of alumni and community members to bring the best of the best to campus. That includes hosting U.S. Supreme Court justices, the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, and countless experts and lecturers from around the world.

Law school rankings

The UH law school has also consistently received high marks in national rankings, including:

  • No. 23 for its part-time and environmental law programs
  • No. 66 for international law
  • No. 71 for legal writing
  • No. 74 for dispute resolution
  • No. 78 for constitutional law
  • No. 91 for contracts/commercial law
recent law school photo
The first graduating class reunited at the 50th anniversary kick-off event in September.

  • No. 2 in the nation for most diverse faculty
  • No. 4 for most chosen by older students
  • No. 8 for best for state and local clerkships

In a from 2009, William S. Richardson reflected on the importance of opening a law school in the islands. He died the following year at the age of 90.

“I鈥檓 proud of it because it means that some people who wouldn鈥檛 have had a chance to go to law school now have that opportunity,” he told host Leslie Wilcox. He added that he enjoyed talking with students and respected their ideas and opinions.

Events to celebrate the 50th anniversary were held throughout the 2023–24 academic year. Tickets for the gala are sold out, but are still welcomed.

.

people inside old building

The post Celebrating 50 years of the UH law school first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198346
Supporting mental health for diverse ethnic groups wins research award /news/2024/05/24/mirikitani-award-duckhyun-jo/ Fri, 24 May 2024 21:27:54 +0000 /news/?p=198360 Reading time: 2 minutes Jo investigated a recently developed self-assessment tool for measuring psychological flexibility/inflexibility.

The post Supporting mental health for diverse ethnic groups wins research award first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes

woman going on a walk with hands up

Improving mental health support for individuals from diverse ethnic backgrounds is the focus of an award-winning dissertation research project.

person smiling headshot
Duckhyun Jo

University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补 PhD candidate in , Duckhyun Jo鈥檚 doctoral research, has earned recognition as the 2023鈥24 Dr. Clifford K. Mirikitani, MD, JD & John M. Mirikitani, JD, PhD Outstanding Dissertation Award from the .

Jo investigated a recently developed self-assessment tool for measuring psychological flexibility/inflexibility called the Multidimensional Psychological Flexibility Inventory (MPFI). Psychological flexibility is the ability to adapt to changing situations, handle stress, and stay true to your values, while psychological inflexibility is the difficulty in adapting, getting stuck in negative thoughts, and struggling to cope with challenges.

Acknowledged for its strong psychometric (science of measuring people’s thoughts, feelings, and abilities) support, MPFI distinguishes itself from other measures. However, there is limited research on its psychometric properties among underrepresented groups.

“Using psychometrically sound measures in mental health assessments ensures that the unique characteristics of Hawaiʻi‘s racially diverse population are considered,” Jo said. “This fosters more effective, culturally sensitive, and equitable mental health practices and policies.”

Professor Akihiko Masuda, Jo鈥檚 supervisor, shared how meaningful and ambitious Jo鈥檚 dissertation is.

“The results of the first phase of research are very promising,” Masuda said. “It will promote evidence-based assessment for underrepresented populations in psychotherapy and behavioral health research and practice, including racially and ethnically diverse populations (e.g., Asian American and multiracial populations).”

Masuda added that Jo鈥檚 impressive academic achievements during graduate school include publishing 12 peer-reviewed papers and one book chapter. Among these, Jo is the first author of eight peer-reviewed papers.

Jo entered the doctoral program in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, but with the guidance of his mentor, he navigated the challenges of the time.

Dr. Masuda nurtured resilience within me,” Jo said. “This award is deeply meaningful as it recognizes my journey toward becoming a scholar, which I see as a continuous and ever-changing process, without a clear end point. I will cherish the lessons gained during my time spent in Hawaiʻi.”

The Department of Psychology is housed in UH 惭腻苍辞补鈥檚 .

The post Supporting mental health for diverse ethnic groups wins research award first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198360
Leeward CC fundraising gala sets records /news/2024/05/23/leeward-fundraising-gala-record/ Fri, 24 May 2024 03:39:30 +0000 /news/?p=198328 Reading time: 2 minutes About 700 guests sampled delicacies from 13 of 贬补飞补颈ʻ颈鈥檚 finest chefs at Leeward CC鈥檚 Lʻulu gala.

The post Leeward CC fundraising gala sets records first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
People preparing food
Photo courtesy of @fiveftfoodie on Instagram

A record number of guests helped to set a new high for fundraising at 鈥檚 annual fundraising gala “” on May 4, that featured culinary and art delights.

Plated food
Poached Shrimp with Tsukemono Pickles, Umeboshi Rice, and Ikura infused with Smoked Tare and Sake (Chef Shaden Sato, Halekulani, with Ho Farms). Photo courtesy of @fiveftfoodie on Instagram

About 700 guests at the sold-out event sampled delicacies from , who were paired with local farmers, ranchers, food producers and fishermen to promote food sustainability. Students from Leeward CC鈥檚 and four high schools (Campbell, Moanalua, Pearl City, Waipahu) were able to work hand-in-hand with the chefs to prepare the featured dishes.

The offerings included lamb sausage cavatelli with Hirabara fennel soffritto, preserved lemon, green olives, parmigiano-reggiano, pecorino romano and Ho Farms mint from James Beard award winning Chef Robynne Maii, who was paired with Mauka Meats, and much more.

According to Professor Donald Maruyama, who served as the event chair, a record $182,000 was raised.

“By all accounts, this year’s Lʻulu was the biggest and best to date,” said Maruyama. “I would like to express a sincere mahalo to all those who made the 14th annual Lʻulu an outstanding event鈥攖able sponsors, guests and donors; Leeward culinary arts program students, alumni and faculty; Leeward CC Lʻulu steering committee and volunteers; and the food and beverage community.”

Between bites and sips of top flight beverages, guests were also able to witness “speed painting” by Leeward CC art faculty Kosta Kulundzic, French artist Eric Maurus and local artist Mikaila K. Ng. During the event, the artists were given two hours to complete their paintings and each piece was auctioned off at the end of the evening as part of the popular silent auction.

The next Lʻulu is scheduled for May 10, 2025.

The post Leeward CC fundraising gala sets records first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198328
Honolulu CC鈥檚 Ho驶olaule驶a celebrates 花秀直播an culture, sustainability /news/2024/05/23/honolulu-cc-hoolaulea-2024/ Fri, 24 May 2024 01:23:08 +0000 /news/?p=198310 Reading time: 2 minutes The event featured hands-on sustainability activities, lei making and Makahiki games.

The post Honolulu CC鈥檚 Ho驶olaule驶a celebrates 花秀直播an culture, sustainability first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
people weaving leaves
Weaving class with Robert Silva

More than 300 people participated in Honolulu Community College鈥檚 Hoʻolauleʻa 2024 in April to honor the rich traditions of 花秀直播an culture and the importance of sustainable practices. This was the first year, post-COVID-19 pandemic, that Honolulu CC was able to bring back the in-person, one-day celebration of Ka Māla o Niuhelewai (the garden of Niuhelewai).

This event featured numerous activities, including hands-on sustainable activities, informative sessions about native plants and wildlife, a Trash 2 Treasure competition, and concluded with lunch featuring kalua pig and sweet potato cooked in the imu, poi and veggie luau stew. Additional festivities included live entertainment, a plant seedling giveaway, lei-making, a resource fair and Makahiki (花秀直播an festival) games.

people prepping food
Honolulu CC crew getting lunch ready

“Ka Māla o Niuhelewai recognizes the k奴puna of the ʻāina o Niuhelewai (elders of the land Niuhelewai) who provided the community with sustenance from kalo (taro) and iʻa (fish) before the diversion of Niuhelewai Stream to the Kapālama Canal in the 1930s. Mahalo to the Honolulu Community College campus and the greater community for the support to bring back the kalo to this ʻāina.” said Alapaki Luke, chair of K奴lana Hawai驶i and 花秀直播an programs division coordinator (Nā Papa Hawaiʻi). “The campus embraces its kuleana (responsibility) to the Native 花秀直播an culture and language by promoting the learning and participation of place-based and cultural values to inform all campus work areas. Mahalo nui loa.”

12 years of kalo harvest

Ka Māla o Niuhelewai began in March 2011 with the planting of more than 20 varieties of 花秀直播an kalo, supported by the Office of 花秀直播an Affairs and the campus. It serves as a learning venue for students, staff and community groups, enhancing their understanding of traditional 花秀直播an knowledge, such as subsistence farming in an urban setting and sustainable stewardship.

Every April, when the kalo is ready for harvest, Honolulu CC celebrates with an annual Hoʻolauleʻa. This year marks 12 years since the first kalo was harvested from Ka Māla o Niuhelewai in 2012.

The post Honolulu CC鈥檚 Ho驶olaule驶a celebrates 花秀直播an culture, sustainability first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198310
Honolulu CC students win high-powered rocketry awards /news/2024/05/23/honolulu-cc-high-powered-rocketry-awards/ Thu, 23 May 2024 22:40:45 +0000 /news/?p=198252 Reading time: 2 minutes Four Honolulu CC students competed in the 2024 First Nations Launch.

The post Honolulu CC students win high-powered rocketry awards first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 2 minutes
Students preparing their rocket outside
Honolulu CC with their rocket on launch day

A team of students won two rocketry awards—for best presentation and safety—at the held in Wisconsin in April.

Students Angello Portillo, Andrew Martin, D驶Elle Martin and Melody Ramos competed in the Moon Challenge, where the objective was to build a rocket that could reach at least 2,000 feet and subsequently deploy a drogue chute (a parachute designed for deployment from a rapidly moving object), payload and main chute upon descent. The payload was required to land safely within a total footprint of 16 x 16 square inches. Throughout the fall and spring semesters, the team collaborated to design, build and fabricate a rocket exceeding 10 feet in length, and its payload.

“Being noticed by the judges that we performed very well on our performances and skills was very reassuring that all of our hard work was really put into effect,” said Portillo, the avionics lead, who worked on programming and configuring the controllers for the ejection charges to deploy the recovery systems and the payload. “I was very thrilled when we got to be recognized by other schools, mentors and peers. The whole experience was very educational and helped me create a network that reaches beyond Hawaiʻi.”

Designing success

Andrew Martin was in charge of designing the payload that mechanically deployed and survived the deployment and descent of 1,748 feet. He also designed a custom payload to record atmospheric data, such as air pressure and acceleration, which provided important information about the flight post recovery. Ramos worked on the payload in its initial stages with the payload鈥檚 preliminary designs and handed off the procurement and specifics for Martin to complete the fabrication process.

Four students standing behind a rocket
Honolulu CC team with their rocket and payload

D鈥橢lle Martin was the airframe design lead who built the rocket, modifying its design to fit the challenge requirements. Patoc provided support to both the electronic payload and the rocket build. Associate Professor of Physics Shidong Kan, Helen Rapozo and Jacob Hudson served as mentors.

“This was a wonderful opportunity for our students to participate in a national-level event,” Kan said. “Our students did a really great job. They learned how to successfully work together to design the payload, assemble the rocket, integrate all of the parts together and strictly follow the launch procedure and checklists.”

Rocket taking off
Honolulu CC rocket launch
The post Honolulu CC students win high-powered rocketry awards first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198252
Hale Aloha Towers renovation project will modernize lobbies, common areas /news/2024/05/23/2024-hale-aloha-towers-renovation-project/ Thu, 23 May 2024 21:14:58 +0000 /news/?p=198254 Reading time: 4 minutes The renovations will feature student-centric designs and ideas throughout each tower, from representative colors to improved study and gathering spaces.

The post Hale Aloha Towers renovation project will modernize lobbies, common areas first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 4 minutes
renderings of the new look for the hale aloha tower lobby area
Render images of the Hale Aloha Tower lobby areas

A renovation project at University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补 student housing facilities that will improve conditions for a third of the student residents began in mid-May and will be completed in time for the fall 2024 semester. The common areas of the four, 13-story Hale Aloha Towers are being completely renovated with new finishes and amenities inspired by input from student residents. New common area furniture is anticipated to be in place by the start of the semester or shortly thereafter.

hale aloha towers
Hale Aloha Towers

The Hale Aloha Towers are exclusively for freshmen and house 1,040 of the more than 3,000 students who live on campus. Renovating the lobbies, mid-floor common areas and top floor kitchens and common areas will enhance the overall living experience for students by creating more inviting and functional spaces for socializing, studying and relaxation. The upgraded common areas will help foster a sense of community among residents, encouraging interaction and collaboration.

“I am thrilled for the incoming freshmen who will be the first to experience the newly renovated spaces,” said Student Housing Services Director David Akana, who is responsible for the project. “We recognized the need for areas that could better support the student residents and help them thrive academically and socially, so we want these spaces to be practical, but we also want them to be somewhere students are excited to spend time in.”

Upgrades across the towers

The project includes polished concrete flooring, improved lighting, ceiling fans and acoustic wooden panels (to help reduce noise) in the lobbies, mid-floor common areas, and 13th floor recreation deck activity lounge of the four towers.

These renovations are one of the many short term and long term improvements for student housing facilities.

The renovated lobbies will be larger after the existing mailboxes are removed and will feature a new reception desk, new furniture—including two bar-height study tables with outlets and chairs—and a big screen TV. New window screens are also being installed in the lobbies to support the natural ventilation of the spaces.

The mid-floor common areas, located on the even-numbered floors of each building, are being renovated to better support group studying and gatherings with new wood benches, additional power outlets, lounge seating, work tables and whiteboards.

The common areas and kitchens on the 13th floor of each tower will have new lounge seating, lawn chairs, picnic and work tables, a big screen TV and a foosball table. The kitchens will be expanded with a built-in bar-top along the walls, a family-style stainless steel table in the center and new appliances and stainless steel countertops. New study cubicles, chairs and lounge seating will be installed in the study lounges.

“As we developed the renovation plans, we wanted to ensure that the common areas in these facilities were enhanced in as many aspects possible, from study spots and places for community building, to numerous aesthetic improvements,” said Joe Lynch, a project manager from the UH 惭腻苍辞补 Office of Project Delivery. “We designed with students in mind, so hearing from them what they would like to see or have in the towers was vital. They played a major role in the final layout that future freshmen will get to live in.”

The project also includes new plumbing lines to support a new water bottle filling station in the kitchen (following other stations that were previously upgraded in the towers); and the building elevators will receive new lighting and flooring finishes.

student moving paper furniture on floor map of aloha tower
Student participating in December 2023 interactive workshop

Student-centric designs

The renovation project incorporated the input from student residents on how the tower spaces could be better utilized. Interactive workshops were held in December 2023 to gather feedback from student residents on what they would improve or add to Hale Aloha towers, with the assistance of the Campus Design Lab, an initiative of the Office of Planning & Spatial Experience, and student project assistants from the UH Community Design Center.

“I spend so much time at Aloha Towers, and because we鈥檙e the ones living in these facilities, it鈥檚 really fun to see what the living space could be,” said Reese Harwood, a freshman who participated in the interactive workshops. “I鈥檓 glad I could be a part of this planning process, and I can鈥檛 wait to see what these spaces could possibly look like in the years to come.”

Unique color for each tower

A special feature of the project is that each tower will have its own splash of color, inspired by the island flower the tower is named after. Hale Aloha ʻIlima will bear shades of yellow and gold; Hale Aloha Lehua will feature bold reds; Hale Aloha Lokelani will showcase tones of mauve and purple; and Hale Aloha Mokihana will spotlight lime greens. The colors will be on the columns in the first floor lobbies, as well as on the 13th floor activity lounges and kitchens.

close up of hale aloha towers render
Close up of render of Hale Aloha Towers colors
The post Hale Aloha Towers renovation project will modernize lobbies, common areas first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198254
Reevaluating maternity care: Professor鈥檚 Fulbright journey in Nepal /news/2024/05/23/fulbright-jan-brunson/ Thu, 23 May 2024 20:58:16 +0000 /news/?p=198256 Reading time: 3 minutes Brunson鈥檚 research is guided by her years of documenting Nepali women鈥檚 stories of ‘near misses’ with maternal mortality.

The post Reevaluating maternity care: Professor鈥檚 Fulbright journey in Nepal first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
Reading time: 3 minutes
people in medical gowns
Brunson and a NICU team at Dhulikhel Hospital

Jan Brunson, associate professor of at the University of Hawaiʻi at 惭腻苍辞补, has received a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program award for research in Nepal for the 2024–25 academic year involving the cesarean section—a crucial but often debated aspect of obstetric care. She will collaborate with Suman Raj Tamrakar, head of obstetrics and gynecology at Dhulikhel Hospital, a leading rural hospital in Nepal.

person headshot
Jan Brunson

The global push toward respectful maternity care, which emphasizes practices that recognize women’s needs and preferences and ensures that they can make informed choices, has prompted medical practitioners worldwide to reassess their obstetric practices, particularly regarding cesarean sections (c-sections). While c-sections can be life-saving in situations such as fetal distress or placenta previa, they also pose risks for both mother and child. The procedure is the subject of continuing debate as the medical profession aims to strike a delicate balance in determining the best timing and circumstances for performing c-sections to avoid both underuse and overuse.

“My research aims to understand this balance by exploring the social, economic and systemic factors influencing cesarean sections in Nepal,” said Brunson. “This project is not just about the numbers or statistics. It鈥檚 about gaining deeper insights about the experiences of women and medical practitioners, and improving maternal health care through respectful and informed practices through a better understanding of the model set by Dhulikhel Hospital, a facility committed to providing affordable, quality care and where profit motives are minimized.”

‘Near misses’ with maternal mortality

Brunson鈥檚 research is guided by her years of documenting Nepali women鈥檚 stories of ‘near misses’ with maternal mortality due to prolonged labor during home births, in contrast to different narratives encountered in Kathmandu where urban families expressed growing concerns about the increasing frequency of c-sections in an area where access is abundant.

Our goal is to ensure that women and families have greater reproductive knowledge and agency, ultimately improving maternal health outcomes.
— Brunson

As Brunson reflects on the broader impact of her work, she stated, “By sharing our findings, we hope to support physicians, midwives and public health practitioners in their efforts to achieve respectful maternity care. Our goal is to ensure that women and families have greater reproductive knowledge and agency, ultimately improving maternal health outcomes.”

Brunson, who joined UH 惭腻苍辞补鈥檚 in 2011, is a specializing in women鈥檚 health and population. She has spent more than a decade conducting ethnographic research in Nepal, exploring reproductive health and family planning in challenging environments, particularly in resource-poor and disaster settings.

Since 1946, the has provided over 400,000 talented and accomplished students, scholars, teachers, artists and professionals of all backgrounds with the opportunity to study, teach and conduct research abroad. Fulbright is a program of the U.S. Department of State, with funding provided by the U.S. government.

The Department of Anthropology is housed in the UH 惭腻苍辞补 .

The post Reevaluating maternity care: Professor鈥檚 Fulbright journey in Nepal first appeared on University of Hawai驶i System News.]]>
198256